New Home? Here’s What You Should Clean Before Moving In

New Home? Here’s What You Should Clean Before Moving In

A new home is a blank slate to be decorated, furnished and filled with memories to come. But first, you need to clean up the previous owner’s dirt. From dust in the corners to grime on the bathtub, a lot of mess becomes apparent when a home is empty. As much as you want to get settled into your new home, it’s best to clean before moving in. With an empty house, you can reach every nook and cranny to get your home truly good as new. Before unloading the moving truck, take care of these essential cleaning jobs.

Be Mindful of What You Bring In

Before you break out the cleaning solution – and before you even pack your first moving box – think about the allergens and irritants you could potentially be bringing into your new home via your old, worn-out furniture. Your mattress, for example, could be harboring microorganisms, such as dust mites, dead skin cells and bacteria, if it’s older than five years. It’s best to replace your old one rather than risk bringing it with you if it’s unhygienic.

Similarly, take a look at your couch and dining room chairs, especially if they’re fabric-based. Furniture pieces in common rooms get a lot of use, and therefore, trap in a lot of germs. If these pieces are relatively new – under about five years old – and in good shape, they may only need to be refreshed. An oxidizing, odor-eliminating spray, such as Nok-Out, can give stinky pieces new life. However, as with your mattress, fabric furniture has a finite life span, so rather than bring them and their germs into your new digs, consider replacing them. After all, this is your fresh start – keep it that way!

Dust High and Low

From baseboards to ceiling fans, no surface in your new home should go untouched. Remember to start high and move down as you go; otherwise, you’ll knock dust onto freshly-cleaned surfaces.

As you clean your new home, be mindful of ventilation. You’ll be stirring up a lot of dust and debris and spraying cleaning solutions, which can irritate your respiratory system. Turn on fans and open windows to maintain air quality as you clean, and choose non-toxic cleaners whenever possible. If you want to be an overachiever, opt for adding an air purifier to help remove bacteria and other pollutants from the air.

Deep Clean the Kitchen

The kitchen is full of hidden messes. Grease, crumbs and dirt hide inside and under appliances, inside cabinets, and in range hoods and garbage disposals. Open everything and clean with a degreasing cleaner; you can make your own non-toxic solvent using this recipe from The Kitchn. (see link below)

Buy a Gallon of SNiPER Disinfectant & Odor Eliminator SNiPER Kills Mold
Buy a Gallon of Nok-Out Odor Eliminator NokOut Odor Eliminator

Descale the Bathroom

Mineral deposits can make a clean bathroom look grimy. Arm yourself with white vinegar, baking soda, salt and a toothbrush for tight spaces to clean the unsightly build-up off faucets, shower doors, and tile. If the build-up is severe, it may be simpler to replace fixtures than clean them.

Clean the Carpets

Unless you’re certain the previous owner cleaned the carpets before moving out, add this task to your to-do list. Even if the carpets look clean, allergens and dust mites are probably lurking within its fibers. If you don’t have one already, now is the perfect time to invest in a high-quality cordless vacuum. These models make for quicker cleanup and are easy to cart around. If you realize your carpets need a deeper clean, use a steam cleaner to get rid of any stains or odors, or better yet, tear the carpeting out and replace it replace it with allergy-friendly hard flooring.

Wash the Windows

Washing windows isn’t anyone’s favorite chore, but it has to be done. Bring a ladder and someone to hold it, and spend a dry, overcast day washing the windows and sweeping dirt from frames and screens.

Clean the Gutters

While you have a ladder, take a look at the gutters. Are they full of leaves and debris? If so, take this time to clean them out; you’ll want rubber gloves and a tarp to contain the mess. Once the gutters are cleaned, install guards to spare yourself this chore in the future.

Replace the Air Filter

A dirty HVAC air filter affects air quality throughout your home. Rather than trust that the last homeowner replaced it before moving, install a new filter yourself. It’s a cheap and easy assurance that you’re breathing cleaner air.

Check the Humidity

Even if your home is spotless, dust mites, mold and mildew can thrive if it’s humid enough. To keep these pollutants at bay and optimize indoor air quality, follow HVAC.com’s recommendation and aim for relative indoor humidity between 35 percent and 50 percent. If you’re out of that range, buy a humidifier or dehumidifier to correct it.

Pausing for a deep clean is the last thing you want to in the middle of a big move. However, you won’t regret spending the time to get your home truly clean before moving in. When you handle these tasks yourself, you can rest assured that your new home is clean, healthy and ready for your family.

Sources

https://www.mattressadvisor.com/best-mattress-guide/
https://www.marthastewart.com/1514361/how-to-dust-right-way
https://www.thekitchn.com/how-to-make-a-natural-kitchen-degreaser-229641
https://www.allergicliving.com/2017/10/25/laying-down-the-best-allergy-friendly-flooring-choices/
https://food52.com/blog/16391-how-to-get-your-windows-squeaky-clean-streak-free
https://www.familyhandyman.com/roof/gutter-repair/the-best-gutter-guards-for-your-home/view-all/
https://www.cnet.com/how-to/how-often-you-should-change-your-ac-filter/
https://www.hvac.com/faq/recommended-humidity-level-home/

4 Ways Improving Air Quality Improves Kids’ Health

4 Ways Improving Air Quality Improves Kids’ Health

Kids are at a high risk for harmful health effects when the quality of air in the home is poor or polluted. Their growing minds and bodies — not to mention immune systems — are more susceptible to allergens, illnesses and pulmonary conditions than adults. What may seem like a small issue to fret over, it could cause serious issues for a child. That’s why it’s important that parents and childcare providers understand what factors influence indoor air quality and how to make your your home or facility is setup to reduce air pollutants. We’ve gathered some of the top tips from air quality professionals to give you a solid start on improving your indoor air quality.

Tip #1 Manage Moisture

Both too much and too little humidity — the amount of moisture in the air — in your home can impact the health of your little ones. Low moisture can dry up your child’s mucus membranes, making it harder for their noses and throats to eliminate germs that can cause illnesses. High moisture has its own impacts, too. With high humidity, breathing can be difficult and mold can grow more quickly. You can control moisture by:

• Making sure all exhaust fans, from your bathroom to your kitchen, vent outside, not into basements, attics or crawl spaces.
• Staying on top of quickly fixing any leaks and immediately removing any water-damaged materials.
• Applying caulking around windows, doors and vents.

Tip #2 Hire Professionals

Air quality is a mighty big project for any homeowner. Consider hiring a professional to evaluate your central air conditioning system and ductwork. If necessary, they can install proper venting around combustible appliances and create outside vents for your clothes dryer. A professional assessment of the ventilation and air quality in your home buys you priceless peace of mind.

That being said, there are many tasks you can do yourself. Use simple precautionary steps like opening windows when using cleaners, solvents and chemicals. This will keep the air free of poisonous fumes and chemicals that might only irritate and adult but can really damage a child. Most homeowners are also able to change their own HVAC system’s air filters. Talk with a professional at your local hardware store to get the best, highest quality filter you can. For example, use an air filter to clean the pollutants out of the air in your home, including pollen, dust mites, mold, and bacteria. Air filters should be changed every 90 days — and more often if you have pets in your home or if anyone suffers from asthma.

Tip #3 Watch for Warning Signs

Air quality can impact common and not-so-common childhood pulmonary conditions like asthma, pneumonia, RSV, whooping cough or Childhood Interstitial Lung Disease. While several of these are caused by encounters with people who have the virus, poor air circulation in your home or childcare facility can accelerate the spread of these illnesses. In addition, allergens in the air can make a diagnosed lung condition worse. Take steps to reduce the allergens in your home and then watch out for symptoms like:

• Frequent coughing, especially at night that can disrupt sleep
• Wheezing sounds when exhaling
• Chest congestion and/or pain
• Frequent cold, flu or other respiratory infections
• Difficulty breathing during active play

Tip #4 Get Fresh Air

While the air quality in your home is very important, you’ll also want to find a balance between indoor air and outdoor air. Exposure to fresh air is essential for healthy kids and growing lungs. Be sure to get everyone fresh air with family-friendly activities right outside your backdoor, such as backyard camping, bird watching, gardening or going on bike rides or walks. If possible, especially if you live in an urban area, try to get them out of the city air and into fresher countryside air. Drive to some nearby forests, mountains, national parks or state parks for an hour, a day or overnight.

Air quality can impact your entire family — from adults to kids, even pets and grandparents. Take steps to manage moisture, keep your filters clean and updated, watch for signs of illness and balance indoor and outdoor air. Improving air ventilation relates directly to improving children’s health.

(This article contributed by Amanda Henderson.  She can be reached at: amanda@safechildren.info.  Thank you, Amanda!)

References

https://blog.esurance.com/how-to-reduce-allergens-around-the-home/

https://www.cigna.com/individuals-families/health-wellness/hw/medical-topics/tips-for-reducing-indoor-pollutants-in-your-home-zp3218

https://www.budgethomeservices.com/the-air-in-your-home-is-dirtier-than-outside-and-what-you-can-do-about-it/

https://www.merrymaids.com/blog/quick-tips/cleaning-tips-for-allergy-sufferers/

https://filterbuy.com/air-filters/20x20x1/

http://www.lung.org/lung-health-and-diseases/lung-disease-lookup/rsv/rsv-symptoms-causes-risk.html

https://plexusworldwide.com/sunnyshare/just-for-fun/13-family-spring-activities